Another Happy Day

2011

Comedy / Drama

0
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Rotten 46%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 44%
IMDb Rating 6.1 10 4020

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Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
March 17, 2021 at 09:51 PM

Director

Cast

Ezra Miller as Elliot
Demi Moore as Patty
Ellen Burstyn as Doris Baker
Ellen Barkin as Lynn
720p.BLU
1.07 GB
1280*522
English 2.0
R
23.976 fps
1 hr 58 min
P/S counting...

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by proteusphi 9 / 10

The Critics Aren't Ready for This

I went into the Savannah Film Festival screening of this film not really expecting much. Of all the movies I saw at the film festival, this one resonated with me the most, and came closest to my heart.

Sam Levinson has woven a dark dramedy of epic proportions as Lynn (Oscar-worthy performance by Ellen Barkin) drives her two sons to her mother's house for the eldest son's wedding. Through it all the audience witnesses the public and private meltdowns and sentimentality's of this flawed, and deeply human family.

From Lynn's confrontation of her divorcé husband (Thomas Haden Church), to her drug-addled, caustic-mouthed son Elliot's (genius performance from Ezra Miller) flirtation with grandpa's meds, to catty quips from Lynn's sisters, past trauma, guilt, and resentment flow onto the screen. What rises from this fertile emotional landscape are frightening moments, and hysterically funny scenes. For the audience it's an event, but Lynn and her boys it's just 'Another Happy Day.'

Humor is the pallet cleanser for this hearty cinematic meal. The viewer fears for Elliot's life after he nearly OD's on the bathroom floor; then breaks into hysterics as Elliot tries to hide his blue lips with mom's rouge, the following morning. It's all so funny, and so smart. You will be cry as much from laughing as you will from the sorrowful scenes.

Performances cut deep with their stark realism. From Ellen Barkin's Lynn, Ezra Miller's Elliot, Ellen Burstyn's Doris, down to 14 year old Daniel Yelsky's Ben - someone is going to get an Oscar nomination here. And if not, then the critics aren't ready for Levinson's dark blend of laughs and tears.

Highly recommended: 9 out of 10.

Reviewed by TroyeEvans 6 / 10

An Ensemble of Outstanding Performances

"Another Happy Day" does not operate in the way usual films do. It does not give you a certain point of climax or intensity and a so-called satisfying, complete closure that many people may expect. Well, these are exactly the things not to be expected.

Look forward to a distinctive drama about a family and the relationships in it. Look forward to a unusual film with both happy and sad moments yet not necessarily with even the slightest of predictability and cheerfulness. It is not necessarily sad, but for certain it does not try to cheer you up.

You can call this film many things. Call it hilarious, call it depressing, call it reality, call it family. It has its share of heartbreaking and heartwarming moments, and it is certainly harsh when it comes to show that this may be exactly what reality may be like. Not all problems can be solved in real life like in the movies, and this is a piece that does not present itself as a typical film; it presents itself as a potential reality, and it goes from there.

The emotions are so rich and deep in this film that it is almost impossible to capture them all so vividly and put them forth on the screen for the audience. But thanks to a group of brilliant performances, the impossible becomes possible, and the power of film definitely emanates more from the incredibly stunning and entirely realistic acting than from the plot.

Despite the total ignorance of this film by the Academy, the performances here alone, not taking the storyline into account, form one of the greatest ensembles of the year. Ellen Barkin as Lynn and Ezra Miller as Elliot, Lynn's son, have delivered one of the most solid and promising performances of the year, and are undoubtedly, as most would say, Oscar-worthy. The emotional collapse of Ellen Burstyn as Doris, Lynn's mother, is another performance too powerful to not pay attention to. The only underachieving one here may be Academy Award nominee Thomas Haden Church, who plays Lynn's ex-husband, Paul, and now has a new spouse, Patty (Demi Moore).

There is a lot of love and hate in this film, and however immorally wrong it may be, this reflects reality in many families, especially bigger ones. The countless issues are not going to just vanish, and it is usually easier said than done to overcome these troubles. In Lynn's case it is even more difficult, with everyone in the family seeming to disapprove of her actions and as Lynn refers to, not on her side. During such a visit with so much hospitality, Lynn must resolve into getting over these problems in the wedding of his son Dylan (Michael Nardelli), who has stayed with Paul and Patty since little age.

Another problem arises as Lynn continues to think and have serious doubts whether she is a good mother. Elliot and Ben (Daniel Yelsky) are both raised by Lynn, and they also have "issues". The former has some kind of severe emotional disorder and can burst into an uncontrollable rampage all of a sudden while the latter is also said to have mildly autistic trouble. Alice (Kate Bosworth), another child raised by Lynn, also seems to have issues and has even hurt herself before. It is in this situation that brings Lynn to the edge. She is on the verge of breaking down, under an extremely uncomfortable environment with everyone pointing fingers at her from the outside and her inner sorrow of her failures on her children.

We have Elliot and Ben. Ben appears as a figure lacking confidence and often feels and reacts badly when others discuss his "autistic nature". Elliot is not your ordinary teenager. He takes teenage drugs and smokes cigarettes, but he is more than that. At times, he seems normal and behaves normally, but at other times, he can act incoherently and totally irresponsibly because of his apparent inability to control himself in certain circumstances. While Lynn has her unbearable load of issues to tackle, the two teenagers also have to deal with their hardships during this somewhat unwanted visit to Lynn's mother.

Alice is not presented to us as a main character though she has been the focus of conversations from time to time, and when she comes up, her problem is no longer her own. It is connected to other members in the family, like Lynn herself, and of course her father, Paul. The relationship between her and Paul is one kind of relationship, and the relationship between Lynn and Paul concerning her is another kind, and then it certainly also causes problems between Patty and Lynn. And between Patty and Lynn it does not end there. With Dylan being Lynn's son but being raised by Patty, his tendency towards Lynn for walking him down the aisle inevitably results in Patty's fury.

The relationships in this family are too complex describe in plain words and you will have to see for yourself how complicated it can be.

"Another Happy Day" has depth in its diversity of emotions portrayed by a group of talented actors and actresses, and it is an enjoyable experience. It is a drama about a family in general. It covers life and death, sicknesses, teenage problems, emotional disorders, marriages, love, and of course, family.

All I have to remind you is that "Another Happy Day" may not really guarantee you a "happy" experience. For most of the audience, I would say "depression" should be the word. But I guess if you face it optimistically and bravely, it can still be a satisfying and happy journey somehow.

Either way, it is a film where extraordinarily great performances meet affluently rich sentimental displays and a film that should be appreciated.

Reviewed by Jack_Rabbit_Slims91 7 / 10

Incredibly depressing story of a family reunion weekend, with some fantastic performances

"Another Happy Day" is an independent/low budget film from newcomer director Sam Levinson that focuses on a middle aged woman Lynn (Ellen Barkin) and her incredibly troubled family coming together for her eldest son's wedding.

The family ties here are quite complicated; Lynn has three sons and a daughter. Dylan, the groom and her eldest son was mostly raised by ex- husband Paul (Thomas Haden Church) and conniving second wife Patty (Demi Moore), Lynn's daughter with Paul is Alice (introduced halfway in the film by Kate Bosworth), who was raised by Lynn and is suicidal and prone to self harm. The younger sons are chronic drug addict Elliot (Ezra Miller) and an Asperger's sufferer Ben (Daniel Yelsky). It doesn't stop there, Lynn has two unbearable sisters you want to strangle (Diana Scarwid, Siobhan Fallonn Hogan) and her mother (Ellen Burstyn), as proper and respectable as she is, lacks any warmth or support for her daughter.

The film is a depressing and an emotionally draining experience. At times it is almost unbearable especially in Lynn's position as everyone around her is either against her or verbally and mentally attacking her to shreds. Burstyn's character makes a point one night of "Why ME!?" , as she reflects on the deterioration of her husband, but the audience's sympathy should be applied to Lynn, she is continually on the verge of a major breakdown but continues to pay no attention to how bad her state is and tries to soldiers on in this "joyous" family occasion.

Despite the film's miserable tone throughout and the lack of any resolution in the end, the film offers fantastic performances all around. In particular Ellen Barkin as the lead is simply stunning and should be recognized for her work here, her career has somewhat stalled in the last 10 years but hopefully with this performance and her recent Tony win we can see more performances of this caliber in the future. Another standout is the very engaging performance of Ezra Miller who plays the son from hell in another 2011 film this year (We Need to Talk About Kevin), and we shall hopefully see a lot more of him in the future. Ellen Burstyn was her usual wonderful self, her scene in the kitchen late at night with Barkin is incredibly intense and realistic, she take your breath away. Kate Bosworth, Demi Moore (a real bitch in this) and Thomas Haden Church are also at their best. Gloomy film, but wonderful cast, and recommended.

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