Dear Evan Hansen

2021

Drama / Musical

3
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Rotten 46%
IMDb Rating 5.2 10 282

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Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
September 17, 2021 at 10:53 PM

Cast

Amy Adams as Cynthia Murphy
Shane Berengue as Shane Berengue
Colton Ryan as Connor Murphy
Gloria Bishop as Parent at Graduation / Parent at Memorial Service
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
1.23 GB
1280*534
English 2.0
PG-13
24 fps
2 hr 17 min
P/S counting...
2.52 GB
1920*800
English 5.1
PG-13
24 fps
2 hr 17 min
P/S counting...

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by hannahevy 10 / 10

Pleasantly Surprised.

I was fortunate enough to see Dear Evan Hansen at its premiere at TIFF. While I didn't have any expectations for the film going in, I left impressed.

Ben Platt and Amandla Stenberg's performances were very strong in particular. I felt they were able to demonstrate their character's flaws in a way that made it apparent that these characters aren't meant to be perfect or looked up to. They're meant to be human. They make questionable choices, and they're met with the consequences for their actions. This was refreshing to see.

Being a teenager who experiences anxiety and social anxiety myself, Ben Platt's performance of Evan Hansen hit home for me. I felt that the creative choices made (especially in 'Waving Through A Window') captured what it is like to experience anxiety. I appreciated that they presented anxiety in a way that didn't romanticize or sugarcoat it.

Given that most teens aren't portrayed by teen actors (see 'Love, Simon', 'Riverdale', 'Fear Street', 'Outerbanks', etc) I didn't find their choice to cast adults in teen roles offensive. Everyone was able to hold their own as both actors and singers, so I couldn't ask for more in this regard. They also presented the musical numbers in ways that weren't forced or showy. I especially liked the way they approached 'The Anonymous Ones', 'Waving Through A Window', 'Requiem', and 'So Big/So Small', as they highlighted how each individual has different mental battles. I feel these numbers worked together to provide audiences with a worthy reminder that we aren't alone in our struggles.

In my opinion, choosing Stephen Chbosky to direct the film was the right decision. Through this, they made a film that sticks with its audience: something touching that you'll think about days after watching it. I also appreciated how they ended the film in a way that is actually realistic/true to a real-life experience.

All in all, I would recommend seeing this movie. At the absolute least, it will remind you to value and look out for those around you, and that you're not alone.

Reviewed by sweidman-28016 6 / 10

Should've Been Much Better

"Dear Evan Hansen, today's going to be an amazing day and here's why..."

Dear Evan Hansen is a film adaptation of the Tony and Grammy Award-winning musical about Evan Hansen, a high school senior with a severe social anxiety disorder, whose letter to himself, one that was not meant to be seen by others, lands into the wrong hands of a fellow classmate who, as a result, commits suicide. This incident sends Evan on a journey of self-discovery and gives him the chance to finally be accepted by his peers and live the life he never dreamed he could have. Let's get the obvious out of the way. There's been some skepticism and hate surrounding the movie ever since the trailer dropped, mainly because Ben Platt (27) is playing a high school student. Is it distracting? Very. But once you get past it, he does give a good performance. Obviously, he knows this character well, much better than the movie knows itself. It's a shame because it doesn't match up well. From what I know, the story here is close to that of the stage performance. The only thing is there's a different understanding in direction. Stephen Chbosky has proven to be a good director in the past, especially with The Perks of Being a Wallflower. A task as big as this is hard not only because of the hype from the musical, but also because it's such a heavy subject to touch upon. This tries to be much more sympathetic with Evan, but as it goes along it's really hard to like him and some other characters. I wanted to feel bad for him because he's struggling, but choices made and the overall feel of the movie don't help with it.

The movie is a bit uneven. I liked it in pieces, but the flow can't get it right. Some scenes understand the right amount of emotion and tension. Those mainly came from Kaitlyn Dever, my favorite performance from the movie, and Amy Adams. They showcase the most amount of grief and anger that's understandable. Because most of the movie plays it too dramatic, it's nice to see a performance that can take away from that part. And the runtime may feel a little long, but once we get those scenes, it feels rewarding at the time. The amount of musical numbers isn't a whole lot and none are these big showy sequences with choreography, but I like that. I'm not sure if the stage performance is like that, but the lowkey nature of those numbers fits well. I wish I could say I liked Dear Evan Hansen more, but it falls short. It's one of those movies that I didn't mind but will soon forget. And maybe part of it had to do with the audience I watched it with, but I'll get into that in a second. Some people are going to connect with this and find it to be an emotional experience. And some are going to hate this because of the unlikable characters. This feels like an easy transfer to screen musical, but it's that easiness that made it weak.

Ok, so I got to see this early (last week) because I'm at an arts school. I know a few other schools had this opportunity as well. I was very disappointed with the crowd. A good majority we're already making fun of the movie before it started, and once it did it spread throughout the whole room. I understand that this movie is focusing on a tough subject and we all respond in different ways, but when someone is given the news that their son has died and then are grieving and going through a tough time, you should not be laughing hysterically. Sometimes it was hard to hear the movie because people were talking over it and basically mocking it. All I could think is since this is such an early screening and a privilege to attend, what if the director was there? Or if some representatives of the film were there? Luckily none were. It was almost embarrassing to be apart of it. People need to understand movie theater etiquette and how to compose themselves in a situation like this. I wish I could've experienced this in a different way.

Reviewed by Hopedoesnotdie 4 / 10

The elephant is in the room even if that elephants dad is cutting your check.

I love the songs from this musical and You Will Be Found is my second favorite musical song ever. But come on man Evan looks 40. Like the kid is supposed to be bullied and be a social loner, and this film goes all meta by giving a genuine reason kids would be scared of him; there's an old man in their hallways posing to be a teenager. It just doesn't work and we know Platt was a rich kid who's dad could pay for those expensive voice lessons but apparently he didn't want to spend any of that money on the digital de-aging process to conflate his sons ego. What comes first is what is right for the story and the art itself. They did not serve the story by feeding one mans ego to continue a role he grew out of. They should've handed the reigns to some unknown kid who they could've FOUND if they did a real search. It would've made the movie more believable and genuine if some unknown talent was able to have a chance- and trust me there are many kids who can sing (ala someone like a Ziv Ziffman from Greatest Showman) there are so many well trained kids in New York who could've potentially played this role. Film is different than theatre. Most seats in a theatre are so far away and the lighting is so bright; the ages of actors can be stretched but the camera picks up the tiniest lie. And this is a huge one. Very disappointed. I love Chobsky ever since Perks of Being a Walfflower but you didn't fool me here.

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