Double Door

1934

Drama / Horror / Mystery

0
IMDb Rating 6.8 10 136

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Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN

Director

Cast

Anne Revere as Caroline Van Brett

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by MartinHafer 9 / 10

The woman is a cancer...a vicious, awful cancer.

Victoria Van Brett (Mary Morris) is a horrible, bitter old woman. She also happens to be rich and in control of the family fortune....and she uses it to control and torment her family. When her niece and nephew try to marry, she does her best to break up the relationships. Why? Well, because she can...and because she enjoys destroying people. But how far she is willing to go....that might just shock you!

This is an incredible film. The opening credits are among the most jarring I've ever seen. You hear Bach's "Toccata and Fugue in D minor" and as you hear this creepy music play, scary faces of the folks who star in the film appear abruptly and fly towards the audience in closeups. You really have to see it to appreciate how jarring it is and I actually yelled out when the faces appeared!

The shame of this film is that Ms. Morris only made one film...this one. Otherwise, her acting was confined to the stage...which is a real shame as she was amazing. One of the creepiest and most evocative performances of the 1930s...that is how good she was.

Overall, this is a seldom seen but fantastic movie...one that you won't soon forget....especially when it comes to that double door!

Reviewed by mark.waltz 6 / 10

Desperation leads to insanity.

It is the performance of the forgotten stage actress Mary Morris who you will remember here, that is if you are lucky enough to find a copy of this rare gem. Obviously based on a stage melodrama which starred miss Morris, she is here in her only film role and is playing a highly despicable character whom you know needs to be locked up and institutionalized herself. As a dominating matriarch of a New York old money family, she has kept her younger sister Anne Revere and her younger half brother under her thumb.

When the younger brother falls in love with the pretty Evelyn Venable, Morris hates her instantly, and takes drastic steps to prevent the family dynamic from being invaded from an outsider. A spooky flashback shows the younger Morris with her half brother doing deeds of such creepiness that you know this is a madness that goes way back, possibly caused by the presumed cruelty of this family's deceased patriarch.

The double door title refers to the family vault, a sound proof room off of Morris's bedroom where the family valuables are kept. through a conversation with Anne Revere and Morris we learn that the older sister has use this as punishment and may do so again should her whacked out brain push her to take these evil steps.

Somewhat theatrical, this is a strange melodrama that is very Edgar Allan Poe in nature although not quite a horror story. There are certainly elements of horror in it, but this is more a melodrama of old money at its presumed entitlement and the methods that some members of the upper class will go to in order to keep family members in line. If this had been made in the 1940's or 1950's, it probably would have had a male patriarch played by Vincent Price rather than the female character, one of the rare genuinely evil women on film in this time period.

Eerie organ music is heard over a few of the melodramatic scenes, and it almost appears to be like a filmed radio play. The young Anne Revere would play similarly severe sisters or mothers as Morris's in films in the 1940s, but nothing came close to this. Standing next to Morris, the male involvement makes the men seem like wimps, and Revere and Venable are definitely upstaged by the subtle performance of Miss Morris who only goes over the top in the necessary mad scene near the end.

it will be pretty obvious to you how the film is going to conclude, but half the fun is getting to that point. I have seeing some grizzly endings in films of this nature, but in watching this even assuming what was going to happen, I was still spooked. So hopefully this will be rediscovered and audiences will find an opportunity to see a rare, forgotten actress show what was being on stages around the country, especially in little theaters that specialized in the plays that are now known as Barnstormers.

Reviewed by blanche-2 8 / 10

overwrought drama, scary as all get-out

From 1934, "Double Door" has one of the most evil characters I've ever seen, Victoria Van Brett (Mary Morris), and a plot that will have you on the edge of your seat, particularly in the last 10 minutes.

Beautiful Evelyn Venable, who was the model for the Columbia Pictures logo, plays Ann Darrow, who marries Victoria's brother Rip (Kent Taylor). Rip, Victoria, and their sister Caroline (Anne Revere) all live in a Fifth Avenue mansion in around 1910.

The family has money, but Victoria controls it and her entire family. She ruins Caroline's chance at happiness by breaking up her relationship, and she works very hard to destroy Rip's marriage. She takes all their wedding gifts, refuses to let the organ play the rest of the bride's entrance, and swaps a $500 set of pearls, an heirloom for the bride, with some cheap necklace. Then she makes them cut their honeymoon short. Ann is determined to be civil to her. You'd need the disposition of a saint.

Caroline is terrified of her, as one time, her sister had closed her up in some kind of vault and keeps threatening to do it again.

Rip and Ann finally have had enough (though I'd say it took Rip an inordinate length of time) and decide to move out. Victoria wants Rip to stay. She comes up with a plan.

This was Anne Revere's film debut after playing the role on Broadway. She's a wonderful actress who has to have big moments of hysteria. I suppose today it seems over the top, but acting was different then. Revere certainly proved herself to be a gifted actress, eventually winning an Oscar.

Mary Morris also did her role on Broadway, and this was her only film. They must have thrown tomatoes at her from the audience when she did the play, not because of her, but because of the character she played.

This is a nerve-wracking film. I highly recommend it.

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