Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart at the River Styx

1972

Action / Adventure / Drama

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
March 28, 2020 at 06:45 AM

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720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
747.96 MB
1280*534
Japanese 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 21 min
P/S 1 / 13
1.36 GB
1920*800
Japanese 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 21 min
P/S 3 / 18

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by boblipton 6 / 10

Were They Serious?

The series continues its wonted way, pleasing all fans of spraying fake blood, fake body parts, and probably fake Japanese stoicism. This time the evil Yagyu clan have ordered their ladies' adjunct to kill off Tomisaburô Wakayama with deadly flying radishes, even stealing baby Akihiro Tomikawa and threatening to drop him down a bottomless well if his father doesn't surrender. He doesn't, and that's two attempts to kill him, with another to come, and his own work. He is, after all, the greatest assassin in all of Japan, blah, blah, blah.

What did the people who made this movie and the others in the series think of it (and them)? Would they even tell the truth if you asked? When this sort of bloodbath flick became popular, did they think they were entering a brave new world, that had such people in't, or did they think that, well, it's a job and they needed the paycheck, so learn the lines and don't trip over the furniture? Or did they view the audience with contempt, like sneering at a bunch of four-year-olds offered a box of Mallomars each? Stupid kids! I'll bet if we offer you Cheetos you'll eat them, too!

Well, technically it's up on its toes. I especially like the sound the pulley makes when Wakayama is drawing the bucket with Tomikawa up from the depths of the well. It squeaks in a way that is indistinguishable from a child's babbling.

Reviewed by Witchfinder-General-666 10 / 10

Pure Blood-Soaked Brilliance - A Highlight Among Highlights

I can hardly find the right words to adequately praise the brilliance of "Kozure Ôkami: Sanzu no kawa no ubaguruma" aka. "Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart at the River Styx". The "Kozure Ôkami" cycle is, simply put, THE greatest samurai saga ever brought to screen, and this second entry to the cycle is (along with the fifth) arguably the most brilliant of all six films. Director Kenji Misumi outdoes himself once again with this masterpiece, and the great Tomisaburo Wakayama is again incomparably brilliant in the role of his life as Ogami Itto. The lone Wolf Ogami Itto returns with his only son Daigoro, on their journey on the 'path to hell'. His expertise is once again put to the touch, as he is both hired as an assassin, and has a whole group of assassins set on himself by the despised Yagyu clan...

The entire "Kozure Ôkami" cycle ranks high among my personal all-time favorites, and "Baby Cart At The River Styx" is my personal favorite of them all, for a variety of reasons. The enemies Ogami Itto has to compete with are one of these reasons. The Lone Wolf and his son have to stand up against a group of female ninjas lead by Yagyu Sayaka (Kayo Matsuo) as well as three assassin brothers called the 'Masters of Death'. The fighting sequences and stylish bloodshed are among the most awesome ever brought to screen, the film is absolutely stunning from the very beginning, the atmosphere is incomparable, and the score is ingenious as in the first film. Ogami Itto's son Daigoro (Akihiro Tomikawa) has grown a bit, and learned to talk (but hardly ever does), since the first film. Daigoro is, as far as I am considered, arguably the greatest child-character ever in a film. The father-son relationship of Ogami Itto and Daigoro is one of the great aspects of the 'Ôkami' films, and makes these ultra-violent Chambara-highlights heart-warming at times. Daigoro's role has become more active in this second entry to the series, and he even actively engages in some of the crafty tricks in his father's fights. Tomisaburo Wakayama is again brilliant in the lead and the rest of the performances are also great, especially Kayo Matsuo is excellent as ninja-lady Sayaka, and so are the three 'Masters Of Death'.

"Lone Wolf And Cub: Baby Cart at the River Styx" is pure perfection in every aspect. The performances and characters, the incomparable atmosphere and locations, the brilliant score and photography, the stunning swordplay,... there is not one single aspect about this film that is not brilliant. I have seen too many films to come up with a list of all-time favorites, but if I ever was to make such a list, this second entry to the brilliant 'Okami' series would definitely be in the top 10! An incomparably brilliant masterpiece of blood-soaked swordplay-cinema, "Kozure Ôkami: Sanzu no kawa no ubaguruma" is essential for every true lover of film! 10/10!

Reviewed by drqshadow-reviews 7 / 10

Blood and Gore, But Also Depth and Development

Disgraced former executioner Ogami Ittō continues his brooding storm through the Japanese countryside, his three-year-old son Daigoro along for the ride in a booby-trapped carriage. Now some distance into their march to vengeance, the pair have drawn so much notoriety that they risk ambush and assassination at every turn. It's not paranoia, either: Ogami dispenses with blade-wielding enemies at nearly every chapter break, downing at least two-dozen men and women before the film is through. The opportunity isn't abused. In true poppy '70s samurai fashion, each challenger (or cluster of challengers) wears a distinct identity and a unique fighting style, like a colorful garden of deadly blossoms. They all bleed day-glo red, though, often in a towering arc of spray that paints landscape and fallen comrade alike. In Baby Cart at the River Styx, for the first time, we see vulnerability from the master swordsman and a little headstrong personality from his young child. We also see uncertainty from a prominent rival, another first, and restraint in the midst of a bloodlust. Some of the fighting is a little awkward, and the formula is threatening to wear thin, but overall this represents a wonderfully stylish, entertaining continuation of the journey that was so well-established in the first film. An excellent genre-definer.

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