Samurai Spy

1965 [JAPANESE]

Action / Drama

2
IMDb Rating 7 10 1507

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Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
November 17, 2020 at 02:02 PM

Cast

720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
919.36 MB
1280*554
Japanese 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 40 min
P/S 6 / 21
1.67 GB
1888*816
Japanese 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 40 min
P/S 16 / 19

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by somers001 10 / 10

One of the best of it's time.

This movie is vary unlike most reviews you'd read on here on IMDb. It is a classic in it's self. Most reviews would tell you this movie is ridiculous, silly, cheesy, corny and has a stupid ending. NONE OF THESE THINGS ARE TRUE!!! The way the movie is laid out and filmed is worth the watching in itself. There's a lot of twists and turns so if your into that sort of thing this one is perfect for you (I am thats why I like this movie so much , but I just hope your good at reading subtitles because if you can't, this one will be REALLY hard to follow.) The acting is pretty good, not excellent but decent. The storyline is genius if you can follow it through till the end and get the meaning of the whole thing. There isn't that much sword fighting in this movie, but more ninja type fighting (shurikan, darts, ball & sickle type thing.) The soundtrack and cinematography compliment the twisting storyline excellently as well. Often, during some events we'll hear sort of a sobbing violin riff that is a nice compliment to the event being portrayed, a thing that is exclusive to this film at the time it was released. Character development for the main character isn't vary strong but we still bond with him, and by the end of the film I found myself cheering him on even though I don't have much background on him as a person. The villain is a cool ninja clad in all white (the guy on the cover of the criterion DVD) while the rest of the villains are some that one would never expect, something that makes this film great, is you never know who is who until the final moments of this film. With this being said, if your a fan of ninja films this is an essential! If your a fan of mind bobbling story lines with twists and turns and mysterious characters, this is an essential. If your a samurai fan, I would At least rent it, if not buy it. So thats about it, great film, 10/10, Masterpiece in its own regard, definitely recommend it!

Reviewed by JetJagMan 8 / 10

Cool, stylized 60's fare. Shallow action fans should give it a pass, though.

If you're lucky enough to get a hold of the Criterion DVD, or perhaps another version with some accurate explanatory material, you will have the benefit of the brief explanatory comments in a recent taping made by the director, Masahiro Shinoda.

He felt that the era of the swashbuckling, self-serious samurai films, such as those of Kurosawa, had come to an end. He wanted to go into a new direction for samurai cinema, that of film noir. This is a political spy tale set in the early 17th century.

The fighting is very stylized, and really just serves as a physical representation of the intrigue, rather than drawing attention to itself. Kurosawa got into the game when the swordplay was rather choreographed, and made things much more realistic, with people stumbling around in the mud, tripping and slipping as they took wild swipes with their swords. Again, Shinoda wanted to go against the grain.

There are cool villains, especially Takatani, completely covered in white, including his hooded head, and he has a soft, menacing voice, too.

The hero, Sasuke, is troubled by war, and waxes philosophical on more than one occasion about the whole business of war and spying.

The music is cool with a jazzy capricious flute, very 60's cool. Shinoda talks a bit about that as well in the interview.

I did not understand the apparently new character in the very last shot, so if someone can shed some light on it, please send me a private message on here.

Reviewed by sc8031 7 / 10

"You're a strange person, Sarutobi Sasuke"

Samurai Spy, despite the generic title, is a solid piece of ninja/samurai espionage and suspense. The plot changes at a brisk pace, there are no slow moments, and the tale is accompanied by inventive music and gorgeous scenery. The story revolves around Sasuke Sarutobi, an agent for the prominent Sanada clan, one which has not publicly allied with either one of the feuding Toyotomi or Tokugawa families during early 17th century Japan. Through his friendship with a day-dreaming (and careless) fellow agent, he becomes linked to a dangerous conspiracy involving the feuding espionage directors of both feuding families.

I was initially going to downgrade the movie based on some clumsy fighting scenes, but some of the stylized action later in the film makes up for it. My main concern was the ridiculously slow and monotonous movements of the protagonist, Sarutobi Sasuke! So many people are killed by the same "daijodan", overhead sword strike -- and in slow motion! Ha, it's not quite up to par with other films from this period, i.e. Sword of the Beast, Sword of Doom, Sanjuro, Samurai Assassin, Samurai Rebellion, etc.

But don't be mistaken. It makes up for the lack of explosive early action with great espionage scenes, fantastic long-range cinematography and zooms, some serious tension in the final few battles, and -- as I mentioned before -- some good stylized ninja action. And there is a decent amount of action, too. It isn't necessarily dull or unbelievable.

The real meat of this piece comes from the plot twists, character development and social/political commentary. As the summary on the back of the Criterion box says, "no one is who they seem to be". The variety of characters, similarity of syllables among the names and historical setting might make this confusing for some folks who aren't "Otaku" (Japan-o-philes) but this is part of the immersion. As another user mentioned, the viewer is hanging onto the plot twists by a hair, much like the protagonist. But I was never TOO confused and found the plot to be ultimately rewarding. Trust me, it's nowhere near as complicated as Kinji Fukasaku's "Shogun's Samurai" (Yagyu Clan Conspiracy). That one requires some aspirin.

The story also has some hefty commentary on (or parallels to) the roles of espionage agents during the Cold War and their blatant disregard for human life in the constant quest for political self-profit. The ninjas here are generally depicted as stoic agents, emotionless tools of their superiors' quest for power. Their presence and deaths do leave some kind of poignant statement in being presented this way (or maybe it's just me?). Director Masahiro Shinoda says something related on the DVD interview: there's something poignant and more life-like to seeing a person die in battle. As though the person who lives, splattered by the other's blood, is actually somehow the loser.

Interesting stuff, with deeper thoughts than you might expect behind a political/ninja facade.

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