The Accused

1949

Drama / Film-Noir / Thriller

0
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 64%
IMDb Rating 6.8 10 847

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Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
December 09, 2021 at 02:02 PM

Cast

Bess Flowers as Court Deputy
Douglas Dick as Bill Perry
Charles Williams as Dorgan's Assistant
Robert Cummings as Warren Ford
720p.BLU
925.66 MB
1280*922
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 40 min
P/S counting...

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by MartinHafer 6 / 10

A great idea that just wasn't carried off that well...

Loretta Young plays a psychology professor who has quite a few neuroses (this is quite the cliché--for once, I'd like to see a movie with a well-balanced psychologist!). One of her students is a cocky young war vet who thinks he's quite the ladies' man. When a seemingly innocent offer to drive her home becomes an attempt by him to force himself on her sexually, she reacts by striking him repeatedly and killing him. In her vulnerable state, she panics and makes the body appear as if he died by accident. Still in a bit of an emotional fog, she stumbles home. Only later when she is thinking clearly does she realize that she should have gone to the police and reported the attempted rape--but by now it was too late.

A problem occurs with the film at this point. Young's character is so flaky that she gets sick and is a delirious state for days. In fact, throughout the film this supposedly capable professor seems on the verge of screaming or crying. When she recovers from her breakdown, the body has been found. Soon, it's ruled an accidental death but a determined homicide detective refuses to give up the case.

Now had Ms. Young's character not behaved so strangely throughout the film (remember, she is a trained psychologist and professor), THE ACCUSED would have worked a lot better. Think about it--a film from 1949 that was willing to actually tackle the topic of rape and killing the attacker. But due to the odd characterization, much of the importance and impact is lost. Overall, it's interesting and worth seeing--but also quite flawed.

Reviewed by mark.waltz 7 / 10

When panic sets in, your guilt will be exposed!

That's what happens for psychology professor Loretta Young when she tries to hide the fact that she accidentally killed one of her students. Of course, The killing was justified considering that the student (Douglas Dick) was possibly about to rape her. She had confronted him during a test and made arrangements for him to be transferred to another class but when he convinced her to allow him to drive her home, they ended up on the cliffs overlooking the ocean in Malibu and in attempting to get away from him, smashed him over the head and arranged for his body to be found in the ocean. His guardian (Robert Cummings) shows up before the body is discovered out of concern for where he's gotten from the dean, and young begins to spend time with him in order to clear her conscience and hide what happened. But with detective Wendell Corey certain that it was homicide, young begins to panic more and more.

"In my next life, I'm going to be a minister. The only one I'll have to pick on is the devil", Corey says, wishing that he had two personalities so he could deal with suspects in a less aggressive manner. it's one of his more interesting characterizations, having played emotionally dead males in a variety of Paramount film noir. Young, having appeared in mostly romantic dramas and like comedies, joins the like of Paramount's Barbara Stanwyck, Veronica Lake and Lizabeth Scott, although her character is far from the vixen that those three ladies play.

It's a bit surprising to see the lady like young handling rats as part of a school experiment, and in the scene where Dick attempts to seduce her, it is very apparent that even if briefly, Young's staid character is erotically excited, even though the majority of her personality is scared of those feelings. much of the film psychoanalyze has her character, especially with the deceased and in voice overs that he has when Young reads his exam. The great detail that is put into the script is surprisingly bright, with Young able to fool a potential witness by eliminating her sexually frustrated attitude with just the addition of a touch of blush and quickly able to turn it back.

Considering the other films that Young had released in 1949 ("Mother is a Freshman", "Come to the Stable"), this is a far cry from those light-hearted performances although it was her performance as the nun in "Come to the Stable" which got her an Oscar nomination. There's a bit of comedy provided by veteran actress Sara Allgood as the overly concerned landlady (one of her last films) so smart girl the movie doesn't drown itself in its psychological banter. I had seen this film years ago in my early twenties and couldn't get into it, so fortunately maturity has made it a lot better.

Reviewed by ccthemovieman-1 5 / 10

Love Is Blind

The Accused This is one of those popular story lines in which the killing is shown early on and then the film deals with the police trying to piece things together while the killer tries to look innocent.

In this case, the "accused" is a woman, played by Loretta Young. She plays a college teacher who defends herself against an obnoxious student but then makes the big mistake of trying to cover up the incident, even though it was self- defense, thinking it would look bad if she was discovered being with this student in the first place. (Today, we read true-life stories of worse, sad to say.)

Bob Cummings and Wendell Corey are detectives who know some foul play is involved but then Cummings, who gets increasingly annoying in here, falls in love with Young. He then winds up defending her in the short courtroom finale. Cummings gives a good example how "love is blind."

Corey, meanwhile, plays the determined cop who doesn't care what people think of him so long as he solves the crime. He is by far the most interesting of the characters in this film. Sam Jaffe also entertains in a supporting role as a crime doctor.

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