The Dream Maker

1963

Comedy / Music / Musical

0
IMDb Rating 5.5 10 48

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Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN

Director

Cast

John Barry as Self - Cameo appearance

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by pegasusunicorn52 10 / 10

I never thought I'd see a film that starred Tommy Steele AND Bernard Bresslaw!

What can be said about Tommy Steele that hasn't been said already? He's a consummate entertainer who tries(at least) to give the audience value for money in whatever he does.

Did anyone see his stage production of 'Singin' In The Rain' a few years back? Sheer brilliance from start to finish. And now he's appearing over the Christmas(2005) period(in the London Palladium, his former SITR home) in a stage adaptation of 'Scrooge'(the Albert Finney film musical that rose--and sank--in the(early) 70s(incidentally Michael Medwin, one of Tommy's co-stars in this film, takes a small role in the Finney musical as Fred, Scrooge's nephew).

But I'm here to discuss 'It's All Happening'(US title, 'Dream Maker').

As Tommy is a great singer it's only natural that the background for the movie should be a record company. Tommy plays a sort of gofer(one who runs around fetching and carrying for bosses too lazy to do things for themselves) to one of the higher-ups in said record company.

Tommy plays an orphan whose former home is in financial straits and, since he knows so many recording artists, he persuades some of them to appear in a concert in order to raise the necessary cash(I'm wondering if John Landis caught sight of this film as his plot for 'The Blues Brothers' has a similar device).

Some of the guest stars who appear all have a background of 70s British popular culture. Marion Ryan, Geoff Love, The George Mitchell Singers(without black face a la their roles in BBC TVs 'Black and White Minstrel Show') all put in an appearance along with a gentleman known as Shane Fenton in this film but who would later come to be known as Alvin Stardust(I always thought he looked a bit like the actor who played Lovejoy in that series). There's also a grinning Russ Conway(the pianist, not the American actor) playing a Spanish-type melody.

Of course there are trials and tribulations before we get to the happy ending. One plot involves the father of Tommy's girlfriend. The man is wealthy and wants to know if Tommy is a fortune-hunter. He hires a private detective played by Carry On star Bernard Bresslaw. That pairing alone makes the movie worthwhile for me.

Another problem is that Tommy gets fired--although he can still go ahead with his concert--because of a setup with the bosses' secretary. But that ultimately leads to the happy ending. Then, on top of all that, he goes and loses the letters inviting his stars to the concert! But all ends well. The orphanage get their money, Tommy gets his girl--and a recording contract to boot! And the film ends with a reprise(by the whole cast) of the song, 'Dream Maker'.

There was only one error in the movie, as far as I could see. That comes when the curtain pulls back so Tommy can go into his song and dance number. It is different from the curtain that can be seen on the stage of the theatre. Obviously the theatre was a real one but Tommy's routine was done on a sound stage at Pinewood(or maybe Elstree) and so the production team hung similar-looking curtains but they didn't get the hang quite right.

That aside, this is a lovely film and it literally cries out for a widescreen DVD release. I don't know how many of the pop stars who appeared in it are still alive(Russ Conway isn't, I do know that) or how long they'll stay alive. Since this film is virtually a time capsule it would be as well to place it on a disc so that those who saw it originally can be captivated by its magic once more. I have no idea who owns the rights to the film but I would hope that whoever does should do the decent thing and place it on one of those shiny silver discs for people like myself to enjoy!

Reviewed by alicespiral 10 / 10

Possibly the best Steele movie

The film is well in the tradition of the classic Hollywood movie-a totally silly plot and great production numbers. Steele comes across as a convincing personality and unlike some of the Elvis musicals of the time he's not plugging his current single and in fact no one else is either. Marion Ryan performs a song which had no commercial possibilities being an extended production number on the lines of Sinatra's High Hopes and some of the other minor stars supposedly signed by EMI such as Dick Kallman and Johnny de Little never came to anything. Carole Deene appeared on a beach in the longest production number which also featured the stars of the George Mitchell Minstrels and this was one of the real highlights as the action switched from an office to a park.

Today a musical of such innocence couldn't exist but I would certainly rather watch one like this than Grease or Dirty Dancing In 1962 Tommy Steele recorded a version of Brook Benton's Hit Record which failed completely but was the kind of bragging song made in the 70s by David Essex ("Gonna make you a star").It would have served very well in this movie!

Reviewed by morpheusatloppers 8 / 10

It certainly was!

A time-capsule of the oft-overlooked era between Rock 'N' Roll and the Beatles, this film was wall-to-wall talent.

While most film records of this era were little more than a string of videos (although filmed - "videos" have been around since the advent of synchronised sound - in the '40s, they were called "soundies") tied loosely by a plot, usually involving a young couple on the loose in a TV studio (they look through a door and the girl says, "Ooh look - there's Freddie Cannon!" - cut to video of "Palisades Park") this one had a BUDGET.

Best bits - the production number between Tommy Steele and Marion Ryan (even though she WAS too old for him at the time) - how come they never released that as a single? - and one of the few film appearances of the legendary (and devilishly handsome) John Barry and Russ Conway.

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